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ADDISON LEE DRIVERS’ COMPENSATION ‘COULD BE TENS OF MILLIONS’

28 Feb 2024

Addison Lee could be forced to pay drivers tens of millions of pounds after a court case was settled, GMB has warned. 

The private hire firm reached an out of court settlement with three drivers who were set to take them to the Employment Tribunal next month. 

Despite multiple courts ruling Addison Lee drivers were ‘workers’, rather than self-employed independent contractors, the company had refused to compensate drivers for lost wages and benefits.   

Addison Lee has now settled three claims, but more than six hundred other drivers have also lodged claims for compensation. 

GMB members have been waiting seven years for compensation, some have died while waiting while others have been diagnosed with terminal illness. 

The union estimates Addison Lee’s final compensation bill could run into eight figures.” 

Steve Garelick, GMB Organiser, said: 

“For seven years, GMB has stood alongside our members in this fight for justice.  

“We are proud to have played a role in securing this outcome, which ensures that Addison Lee will pay drivers the millions they are owed. 

“One of our lead claimants has a terminal illness and we have lost other members during this battle for them and their families the win is bittersweet. 

“We urge other companies to learn from this case and ensure their workers are treated fairly.” 

Liana Wood, of Leigh Day Representing Drivers, said:  

"This settlement is yet another blow to big firms operating in the gig economy.  

“It is a reminder that companies cannot ignore their legal obligations and must treat their workers fairly."